Tuesday, February 07, 2006

Spared The Blood And Gore

"More recently [Al Gore] set up a London-based ethical investment company with a former Goldman Sachs director, David Blood (disappointingly rejecting the opportunity to call it Blood and Gore...)."

It's good to see that Al Gore is now getting a lot of attention and respect; good guys don't always finish last:

"Celebrity took an unusually nerdy form at this year's Sundance Film Festival. The man everyone wanted to meet, talk to and be seen with wasn't a film star or daring new director. It was a politician, who is in his sixth year of retirement and more famous for what he didn't achieve than for what he did. Al Gore has been to Sundance before, but never as a leading man.
...

'He was the celeb of the week,' says the Village Voice's Amy Taubin, 'both in terms of reporting about him and people reporting to each other. They were all saying, "He's so amusing. Why wasn't he more like that when he was running?"

But we're not spared the frightening truth about global warming

... it's riveting largely because of the conviction and energy with which Gore delivers the presentation that is its backbone. Since his defeat by some hanging chads and the US Supreme Court in 2000, Gore has been touring the country and the world, giving a passionate, expertly documented multimedia presentation on global warming, in halls and on campuses, mainly to invited audiences. This campaign is personal and impassioned."

Personal tragedies caused him question what he was doing (as so often happens - we ought to learn from others' experience and do this anyway) and made him focus on what was really important to him:

"Gore talks personally and candidly about events that have shaped his life, among them his son Albert's near death at the age of six.

... the experience made Gore question what he wanted to do with the rest of his life and led to his writing Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit, a meticulous review of what he calls these days the planetary emergency. It is often said to be the best book written by a serving politician. In the film, he talks, too, about his sister, who died of lung cancer ('that's not one of the ways you want to die,' he says in a voiceover) [French people in particular, please note]."

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,1702168,00.html

A beautiful style for a shocking book

From a review of his book on Amazon:

When I signed up for a required ecology class at my college, I never expected to have this book as the only textbook for the class... I even remember mentioning loudly, much to the amusement of the other students, that I had to read a book written by a man who doesn't move his head and can't dance. I sat down to read the first assigned reading and was pleasantly amazed. The book isn't boring at all. Al Gore has a beautiful, flowing writing style. I managed to read an entire required book without a sign of fatigue or distraction. It even had pictures to keep my thoughts from straying. I am not ashamed to say that I enjoyed this book. I really mean it. Even if you are not into the environment, at least read it to be shocked by a book that defied many of my preconcieved notions about the man."

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618056645/qid=1139418705/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_0_3/026-2531562-7978019

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